#3348
♠️ MARCEL
Administrator
  • Topics: 38
  • Replies: 366
Joined:
Nov 30, 2017
@mf448kxn6
North UK
GTR
Points: 4,203

Hey, take your time , my bad for the brain overload😬.  Had to cover the common culprits that may be part of issues you describe.  If there was something i said you need to check, I can elaborate more.

As for your tools, well a digital multi meter should be next on your list (halfords, etc)
& when you’re feeling more confident to take down some small thing , you can expand your tool collection.  Usually Argos/Halfords tend to have 3-figure assorted tool set to cover various things (eg. 120-piece tool set etc..)

Hell in 2020 you may be doing your own oil changes, if not already! – Saved some garage bills have we? 👋  Plus you have a Naked bike with less plastic coverings so life is easier for you lol

Your pictures today are much better, so start with the main culprit of cuts. Stand Switch!
It is number 6 on the image below  with a long black trailing wire jacket along the frame

There is 2 wires inside the black jacket.
We cut  #6 away and put it in bin.
Then we peel away the black sleeve tubing containing the 2 wires… those 2 exposed wires get joined.  Then lots of tape cover them and hide it away.

Now we have got rid of the switch and bypassed it  (fooling the bike, so it never cuts again)
But ofcourse make sure the stand is up before setting off or be sat on the bike before starting it 😉

That tube with a “slit” at the end is nothing to worry about,  it faces the floor. It helps the engine dump away excess junk (ie. someone messed up his carbs , or too much oil was in , or engine is breathing away oily mist in to atmosphere near ground)
You rarely need to pay attention to it , except just general cleaning around it so mud doesn’t clog the port/slit.

If you also go to the right side of bike but directly behind the rear engine + red shock spring
U will see a long slim tube coming from the FUEL tank going down to the ground
This is called “tank overflow” – (overspillage, overfilling, etc… excess fuel is dumped away in to atmosphere/ground)
The only thing to make sure is that no exhaust pipe at the back is touching any pipes (fuel vapor!)   If its a new bike,  it is already probably guided down nicely away from the exhaust anyway.

You are correct to say “let things out”, pretty much “excess liquids” the bike doesn’t want.👍

There is a 3rd final hose that points towards ground, it is hidden somewhere along the right side of the frame  but  they end up at your silver carbs in the middle of 2 engines.
The carb will “let excess fuel out”  to the ground / atmosphere  (like the tank & engine^)
Only happens if the bike falls to the side or someone messed something up inside the carbs causing it to flood itself inside.

Since your bike is 1k old and under warranty, you can digest what i said in prior replies,  as some kind of bullet list then probe your mechanic to confirm the bike’s history, its service records, test records etc…

Actually,   use this list then you will be happier to ride it and bike should be on spec , nothing out of place.  Some things i will quote many will also agree as the general consensus to change outright.  I didn’t cover every single nook n cranny but just the stuff to do now (more in 2020)

Tyres = #1. Too crucial.  Change to Michelin Pilot Street Radial, Michelin Road 3 or 4,  Bridgestone T30/T31 , Pirelli Angel GT.  Put simply , if you see “SHINKO” on your current tyres,  assume they are suicide bricks that can’t be ridden in the wet,  nor they inspire confidence.  As rubbish as chinese rubber lol.   So i stress this not because its a heavy bike, but damn, it will slide on rubbish tyres in the rain,  doesn’t inspire much safety does it in a rain session!
Michelins are my top choice always.

Engine ===> Valve Clearances (he must prove it was done, regardless, engine makers said to do it at 600-1k, then every 4k)

Oil ==> Strictly “Motul” or “Silkolene” branded Ester oils go such a long way over rubbish cheap oils.  If he says “it doesn’t matter” , ask him what does he know about oils lol.     The Motul/Silkolene Ester oils are premium meaning it will last longer,  your clutch tends to like it.
Oil change is every 1,000 miles  (1500 is a true limit but its 125cc, so it has a harder life already, changing at 1k is more ideal)
Choices ==> 10w40 Grade or 10w50/10w60 grade (best) == it must always start with “10w” only. Walk away if you are suggested a “20”.  The oil names are:
Motul 7100 , Motul 300v, Silkolene Pro 4, Silkolene Comp 4,  , choose whichever suits your budgets.

Bike takes  1.5 litres, so you will  get 2x 1L bottles.

Rarely do i trust the oils used by mechs , as they are simply a huge container of cheap oil used across many bikes  (cost saving) ,  better for the customer to supply their own oil and whatever other parts need replacing on the bike.   Sorry if this sounds like some kind of dissertation,   but   personally i spare no expense to good tyres and good oil.  I’d like to be home safer and with an engine that isn’t drinking black blood lol ( Silkolene stays Red 😉 )

Oil filter is always changed too  it is on the right side of the engine casing and it says “OIL FILTER”  , easiest job. 3 screws out,  change and go!  (tap here so you see what i mean)
You want clean filtered oil circulating

Fueling = As before in my past replies, perharps the mech will confirm the fueling side has been thoroughly cleaned up  (lines, filter , and carbs = no more excuse for clogs/bogs/hard starts)
He will put it in books for your history and see how long it behaves good for, hopefully all the way in to 2020.

Brakes  =   Goldfren carbon ceramics are great pads, they absorb some of the heat made by the brake discs  so the brakes dont always need to feel delayed or spongy (helps in the slower wet braking too).   or EBC “HH” branded brakes  . The brake calipers both front and rear use  “FA 86” code for the size of pads,  very common pad, so most bike shops will have it on the shelf outright.  I say this as cheaper chinese organic pads make an ashy mess (brake dust) and they tend to squeel and the like .   The claim “it doesn’t matter”, walk away when you hear that. Brakes are MOT anyway, so your tester checks how the disc looks and where your pads are (if too worn down)

Battery =  Outright,  if there is a battery smaller than 12ah (printed on it) , change it . As i was saying from previous reply, smaller sizes don’t help in winter, old batteries can’t handle the cold, so they are just weak overall.  It will annoy the bike always trying to charge it up. It has other places to feed power to lol.  So a battery can be swapped out by you even. Just pop off the rider seat and look at it.

Electrics = As its under warranty , aftermarket products may void it unless the dealer is cool & knows hyosung electrics very well.     So if it is 1K old, I will give the benefit of doubt that the bike is too new to start failing its electrics now , but it can’t hurt to get confirmation readings  (he will write down his findings)  – He has to as bike is now at 600-1000 mile mark, part of servicing involves checking electrics so everything is behaving as it should.
He can confirm these?
– Coils  ===> under 6k ish ohms from Chassis to HT Cap (or investigate/change)
– Regulator  ==> showing 14-15v at the battery around 3k revs (any 13.x/12.x = change it)
– Spark plugs  ==> Not using “CR8EIX” (Hyosungs hate it, even if other brands like it)

Crucially at the electric stage , just improving the spark plugs alone can pay off well, and you can do this , if you go under your seat there must be a long metal tube thing, thats a “plug removal” tool or can buy one (?)…..  I’d suggest getting Laser plugs, they last 50k or 2yrs whichever comes first if your carbs have been cleaned (=cleaner fuel)

If there is something you’re not sure of, you  can always take a picture of it or I will find a cartoon diagram to explain what it is.    or can make a short technical list and your mech will say yes or no to each point , then service what needs doing etc…

I was digressing as you mentioned its 1k fresh, that’s a young one for sure, so wanna make sure its off to a good start.      Most newer customers bikes i service are well in to  4-7k already lol. Then i start to do major things to them.

Hope what i say helps today! Ride steady out there….

// Meditation doesn't mean you have to sit still....

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